Deliver: a book review

deliver Description:

Can something broken ever heal?

Martyn is broken. After torturing his best friend, he doesn’t belong anywhere in Acktar. No matter how far he runs, he can’t lose his guilt.

Leith is broken. While healing from the torture he received at Nalgar Castle, he struggles to find his new role. But can a Blade ever outrun his past?

The country is broken. Bitterness divides town against town, neighbor against neighbor. What will it take to deliver Acktar from itself?

They face their hardest battle yet.
Peace.

 

My Review: 

Can they ever be more than Blades?

One might think that with the war over and Respen the usurper gone, peace will have settled on the land and everybody lives happily ever after. Right?

Not Quite.

The new Acktar has no place for Blades. Those who were not banished struggle to find a place in a world where they can’t seem to fit, living in constant fear of being discovered for what they are, and killed. Rebuilding what they destroyed might take more than they can give.

Leith, still struggling with healing wounds, takes most of the other Blades to Stetterly to help with rebuilding, but if the villagers learn the truth, will a pardon be protection enough? Forgiveness is slow in coming, but as Rovers and the remains of Respen’s army plague the countryside once again, the Blades skill may be the only thing that saves the people of Stetterly.

Martyn, angry and guilty, has trouble letting go of what was. When King Keevan gives him a chance to get away, scouting the borders for trouble. He takes it. A chance encounter changes his plans abruptly, but is it enough to change his heart? When Martyn uncovers a sinster plot to be rid of the newly crowned King, past secrets come back to haunt him. They may just destroy him.

Deliver was one heck of a finale to the Blades of Ackar! This series is one of my favorites, and I’ve already read it several times over. Most likely I will be re-reading it again soon! Tricia Mingerink never fails to impress. The ending was a happy one, but I’m still a bit sad that the series is finally over. I still find myself wishing for ‘just one more book’! Or at least a little more about how certain things turned out. I would have loved to see the scene with a certain trial and Keevan placing his proposal before the nobles. It could have gotten interesting.

It was wonderful to see Leith and the Faythe sisters again, seeing how much they’ve changed since the beginning. Renna especially has grown a lot, stepping up from timid girl to strong leader. The new addition of Martyn’s POV adds some new tension and plenty of sarcasm. Both plots were beautifully crafted and well paced. Battle scenes were strong and faith is foremost in this story.

The only thing in the story that felt slightly off to me is that one character who was severely injured, did a lot more than he ever should have been capable of considering his injuries. I felt that the author greatly downplayed the injuries. If his wounds were not that serious, it should have been mentioned, nor should his recovery have taken as long as it did.  It’s a minor quibble though, and in no way detracted from my enjoyment of the story.

My Rating: Five Flames

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Heat Advisory:

Romance: clean and sweet. There was one point in the plot where some men attempted to attack a girl, but it was kept very clean.
Language: clean
Drinking/Drugs: Laudanum and whiskey was used for painkiller on an injured character, making him unusually talkative!
Blood/violence: There is a lot of violence and a bit of blood, but Mingerink never goes into detailed descriptions. Though there are several battles, death and a variety of wounds from sword wounds, to arrows, rocks, and severe burns, the author still keeps it clean.

Amazon Kindle Link
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Author Website
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Happy Reading y’all!

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